Author Archives: Eiko

Workshops online: formalizing theories, network models, and questionable measurement practices

In the last month, I got to give 3 workshops on fairly different topics, and we made all materials available now. I also followed Lisa’s example (thanks for the tip!) and created an OSF website specifically for my talks and workshops. This blog summarizes the last workshops, and provides links to all materials. 1. Formalizing… Read more »

Brief psychology news 07/2019

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July 2019 news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Meta Psychology, and Open Science. For prior news, see the rubric Psychology News on this blog. Clinical Psychology Today has a number of new blogs by researchers; they recruited fairly heavily at APS. For instance, check out the new blog “The Game Changers” by Jennifer Tackett. Allsopp… Read more »

Brief psychology news 06/2019

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June 2019 news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Meta Psychology, and Open Science. For prior news, see the rubric Psychology News on this blog. Clinical Ruscio with a new review paper “Normal Versus Pathological Mood: Implications for Diagnosis” published in the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology. [Personal note: Check out this paper with the argument… Read more »

Brief psychology news 03/2019

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March 2019 news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Meta Psychology, and Open Science. For prior news, see the rubric Psychology News on this blog. Clinical Cristea et al. performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of biological markers evaluated in randomized trials of psychological treatments for depression. They find that the beneficial effects of psychotherapy for… Read more »

The replication crisis hits psychiatry: No candidate genes for depression

A new study on candidate genes for depression was just published in the American Journal of Psychiatry by Border et al, entitled “No Support for Historical Candidate Gene or Candidate Gene-by-Interaction Hypotheses for Major Depression Across Multiple Large Samples”. Below, I will discuss the background and context of the study, followed by study design and… Read more »

Brief psychology news 02/2019

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February 2019 news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Meta Psychology, and Open Science. For prior news, see the rubric Psychology News on this blog. Clinical If you are interested in re-analyzing clinical trial data, check out clinicalstudydatarequest.com. Preprint by Raphael Schuster et al.: Effects of intense assessment on statistical power in randomized controlled trials: Informed… Read more »

First preregistered network replication study with power analysis & open data

I haven’t written blog posts about individual new papers in over a year, but this one is a milestone I’m really proud of: Our new network paper on social media and well-being was published today. Specifically, we looked at the relations between Facebook use, rumination, depressive, anxiety-, and stress-related symptoms, social comparison, contingent self-esteem, and… Read more »

Brief psychology news 01/2019

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January 2019 news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, Meta Psychology, and Open Science. For prior news, see the rubric Psychology News on this blog. The subheaders below are only rough approximations, since many items fit multiple categories; I only list each item once though. If you have suggestions how to better order this, please let… Read more »

The Myth of the Miracle Cure: Is Ketamine an Efficacious Antidepressant?

This blog post is the result of a collaboration between Dr Lucy Robinson (Twitter, email) & me. Life with depression can be miserable, painful and sad. The suffering it causes is indubitable and it is imperative we do a better job at helping people feel better, with effective, practical, and long-lasting treatments. The promise of… Read more »

Brief psychology news 11/2018

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November news from Clinical Psychology, Quantitative Psychology, and Open Science. New free R ebook “Statistical Thinking for the 21st Century” by Russell Poldrack Kevin Kotzé shared all materials for his master/PhD course on time-series analyses online New free ebook “Ecological Momentary Assessment in Mental Health Research” by Jeroen Ruwaard, Lisa Kooistra, & Melissa Thong Manylabs… Read more »

James Coyne sued me for cyberbullying

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In this blog, I first describe the formal complaint of Dr James Coyne against me, launched a week after my blog post about tone on social media in August 2017. Coyne claimed that I am “aligned with racism” and show “hostility towards patient populations”, concluding that “something needs to be done quickly”. Second, I discuss… Read more »

Brief psychology news 10/2018

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September and October news from clinical psychology, methods, and open science. With a heavy focus on open science this time around — a lot happened in the summer. Guardian piece by Chris Chambers & Pete Etchells: “Open science is now the only way forward for psychology”. Interesting Twitter discussion on paying peer-reviewers, with a 2014… Read more »

Failure of the week

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In our Clinical Psychology group in Leiden, we have the tradition to share new papers, accepted grant proposal, and other achievements in emails called “Paper of the Week”, “Grant of the Week”, and so forth. I just started here, so I don’t know where the tradition comes from, but it’s great to receive regular updates,… Read more »